Fiona Adamson from the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London received the prize for her paper Sending states and the making of intra-diasporic politics: Turkey and its diasporas in Europe.

Commendation: The jury awarded the prize for the outstanding quality and originality of the argument, as well as the significant potential of the paper’s conclusions for further advances in this field of study. Through an historically contextualised approach, the paper moves beyond actor-based models of diaspora politics to show how, in the case of Turkey, diaspora politics and state diaspora policies are historically co-constituted. The paper then locates “homeland politics” and “diaspora engagement policies” as part of larger processes of Turkish state- and nation-building. The paper was seen as innovative at both the theoretical and empirical levels through its highly sophisticated account of key concepts and theories in the field of diaspora studies.

Fiona will be awarded a prize of €500 kindly provided by the prize's sponsor, Comparative Migration Studies. The prize will be presented at the CES IRN network meeting at the Philadelphia Conference of Europeanists, April 14-16, 2016.

Runner-up: 

Daniela Hochfellner (Michigan) and RüdigerWaplwer (Institute for Employment Research), Do High-Skilled Immigrants Find Jobs Faster Than Low-Skilled Immigrants?

Shortlisted papers:

Paolo Cuttita, VU Amsterdam, Mare Nostrum, Humanitarianism and Human Rights Exclusion and Inclusion at the Mediterranean Humanitarian Border

Costica Dumbrava, Maastricht University, Reproducing the Nation: Reproduction, Citizenship 

and Ethno-Demographic Survival in Post-Communist Romania

Andrea Schlenker (Lucerne), Ieva Birka (Riga), Joachim Blatter (Lucerne) Practicing Transnational Citizenship: Dual Nationality and Simultaneous Political Involvement among Emigrants