Panel proposed for the 16th IMISCOE Annual Conference, Malmö, 26-28 June 2019

Information

Cities have become important arenas where responses to migration and migration-induced diversity are negotiated. These processes involve a wide range of actors including not only local governmental authorities and elected political representatives but also welfare organizations, migrant associations, religious actors, civil society initiatives, economic organizations or cultural institutions. While an increasing number of studies conceptualize local policy-making and the urban governance of migration and diversity, limited attention has been paid to the dynamics in this field. However, the actors involved in the politics of urban diversity as well as their claims, practices, resources, positions of power and interactions are not static but changing over time.
This panel seeks to stimulate discussion on conceptual and methodological opportunities and challenges in capturing such changes. We invite empirical and conceptual contributions focusing the dynamics in the politics of migration and diversity in urban contexts in or beyond Europe.

We seek to discuss questions such as: How does the actor landscape in this political field (or subfields) change? Can we observe new relationships and coalitions between actors? How do the claims, strategies and forms of participation of different actors change? What shapes such changes? And do they impact local political responses to and meanings of migration and diversity?
If you are interested in participating in the panel, please send your abstract (max. 250 words) and a title by 26 November 2018 to both This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Please do also add your institutional affiliation. We will inform you before 1 December 2018 whether your contribution is accepted for the panel proposal.

Organisers

  • Christine Lang (MPI MMG Göttingen, Germany)
  • Maria Schiller (University of Vienna, Austria)